Greece According To The Econonist

 A panorama of the 7 cover pages from The Econimist that feature Greece dating back to April 2010. How times have changed!  Images from The Economist

A panorama of the 7 cover pages from The Econimist that feature Greece dating back to April 2010. How times have changed!

Images from The Economist

Greece, the sick prodigal child that should have never joined the European Monentary Union, has gone through quite a rough patch in recent years. We could banter all day about its graying history through the yellow lenses of austerity, or we could just let pictures do the talking.

Looking back, it has not been as picturesque as it is artistic.

We are penning this a few hours before Greece becomes the first ever European nation to default on a payment due to the IMF.

It is also during a period of time when Greek banks will be closed for an entire week at length, and when the stock market in Athens will remain shut alongside its banks - all these have never happened before in all of Greece's legendary past.

However much we disagree with the current Greek government's approach to a crisis that has gone unabated since 2009, we strongly sympathize with the average Greek. This week comes almost as a nightmare for ordinary Greeks, a week which will probably be protected in the most excruciatingly slow manner.

The scale of hardship that confronts its citizenry is hard to understate. Haunting as it is, most would find it hard to remain jingoistic to the Greek heritage that had served the populace exceedingly well before the euro was introduced.

Imagine having practically no access to the money in your bank account; banks have their shutters down for the week, and cash machines only dispense €60 at best, assuming you could even find one that has some left in it. Imagine also walking into any supermarket or provision shop to find the shelves cleared of everything.

Scenes that would normally be synonymous with a country in their darkest times, is now playing in full technicolor in Greek theaters.

As a cynic would opine, "it's just that the chickens have come home to roost, " and we would add by questioning if Greece has brought it upon themselves. The writing on the wall suggests so, but we shall stick to telling the story in pictures.

  30 April 2010:  The cover page features German Chancellor Angela Merkel in military uniform staring squarely forward amidst a backdrop of an emergency hanging over Athens. "Acropolis now" bangs in bold white font, highlighting the dire state of affairs as the sun sets behind its national monument.  Image from The Economist

30 April 2010: The cover page features German Chancellor Angela Merkel in military uniform staring squarely forward amidst a backdrop of an emergency hanging over Athens. "Acropolis now" bangs in bold white font, highlighting the dire state of affairs as the sun sets behind its national monument.

Image from The Economist

  25 June 2011:   "If Greece goes..." down the sink hole as a man clothed in a business suit looks over. 2011 was a year of uncertainty for Greeks, bestowed with political reshufflings and confusion over its membership status in the Eurozone.  Image from The Economist

25 June 2011:  "If Greece goes..." down the sink hole as a man clothed in a business suit looks over. 2011 was a year of uncertainty for Greeks, bestowed with political reshufflings and confusion over its membership status in the Eurozone.

Image from The Economist

  5 November 2011:  "GR€€C€" is probably the most ill fated nation to join the Eurozone, with the most "Es" or "€s" in its name. As Greece started contemplating dropping the euro, it might be that the country would become incomplete as the depiction suggests. It might also mean that Greece has weighed on the euro, and the Eurozone for that matter.  Image from The Economist

5 November 2011: "GR€€C€" is probably the most ill fated nation to join the Eurozone, with the most "Es" or "€s" in its name. As Greece started contemplating dropping the euro, it might be that the country would become incomplete as the depiction suggests. It might also mean that Greece has weighed on the euro, and the Eurozone for that matter.

Image from The Economist

  12 May 2012:  "Europe's Achilles heel" is the obvious Greek Spartan who has been stripped of his clothes and armor, now wounded with an arrow to his heel, all while be votes no at the ballots. But "no" to what?   Image from The Economist

12 May 2012: "Europe's Achilles heel" is the obvious Greek Spartan who has been stripped of his clothes and armor, now wounded with an arrow to his heel, all while be votes no at the ballots. But "no" to what? 

Image from The Economist

  19 May 2012:  "The Greek run" certainly lights the hairs on Europe's back. But in this aptly illustrated cartoon, the mighty Greek Olympian with a torch from the 2004 Olympics blazes more than just a trail. The euro is being smoked, both literally and perhaps also symbolically.  Image by The Economist

19 May 2012: "The Greek run" certainly lights the hairs on Europe's back. But in this aptly illustrated cartoon, the mighty Greek Olympian with a torch from the 2004 Olympics blazes more than just a trail. The euro is being smoked, both literally and perhaps also symbolically.

Image by The Economist

  31 January 2015:  A female Greek statue has her right arm gone but holds a 1970s styled revolver by her left hand, staring rather nonchalantly towards might be German, saying "Go ahead, Angela, make my day". By this day, both sides are at loggerheads at just about every matter revolving the ongoing crisis. Greece has also elected a new but incapacitated government.  Image from The Economist

31 January 2015: A female Greek statue has her right arm gone but holds a 1970s styled revolver by her left hand, staring rather nonchalantly towards might be German, saying "Go ahead, Angela, make my day". By this day, both sides are at loggerheads at just about every matter revolving the ongoing crisis. Greece has also elected a new but incapacitated government.

Image from The Economist

  20 June 2015:  "MY BIG FAT GREEK DIVORCE" stars Greek Prime Minster Alexis Tsipras and German Chancellor Angela Merkel as they are perched on the same cliff in what seems to be the climax of a blockbuster series. Reviews are satirical for some, but the question remains as Europe watches on: Will they jump, or turn back? No hands were held on this one, nor were rings tossed.  Image from The Economist

20 June 2015: "MY BIG FAT GREEK DIVORCE" stars Greek Prime Minster Alexis Tsipras and German Chancellor Angela Merkel as they are perched on the same cliff in what seems to be the climax of a blockbuster series. Reviews are satirical for some, but the question remains as Europe watches on: Will they jump, or turn back? No hands were held on this one, nor were rings tossed.

Image from The Economist

Will there ever be a happy ending to this sequel?  Only time will tell.