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Britain On Brink Of Deflation, BoE Expects It Even Lower

Britain On Brink Of Deflation, BoE Expects It Even Lower

First it was Europe that was mired in its coldest deflationary winter ever, then America promptly caught on. It was only a matter of time when cheap energy prices claimed its next victim - Britain. Unlike the Eurozone whose February CPI change settled at -0.3%, the UK saw no change in its price index from a year ago, missing estimates of a 0.1% rise and down from January's 0.3% change. The core figure (excluding food and energy) missed expectations of 1.3%, coming in at 1.2% from January's 1.4%. The market collectively expects deflation to officially strike in March. This comes on the heels of the BoE's Governor Mark Carney's comments about inflation dropping below zero in the next couple of months. Earlier in March, the Bank of England's MPC voted to keep interest rates at a record low of 0.5%, but foresaw a rate hike somewhere in 2016. The BoE is expected to trail the Fed in terms of monetary policy.

Euro Parity, Coming Sooner Than You Expect

Euro Parity, Coming Sooner Than You Expect

The time from when we last published our latest addition of the Daily Grail has been rather eventful. From the blistering jobs report 2 weeks ago that propelled market's expectation for a June rate hike even higher, to the continuation of monetary policy bifurcation by the world's central banks that will soon see the Euro trading at par to the Dollar, the month of March has so far endowed the financial markets with much needed cross-asset volatility.

On 22 January, the ECB unveiled something the world had never seen before. Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank, announced that for the first time in the 14 years of the Euro's existence, the ECB was going to monetize debt securities to the tune of €60bn/month. Just 2 short months ago, the ECB termed this open market operation the EAPP (Expanded Asset Purchase Program).

2 months and 1000 pips later, the ECB has coined a new term - the PSPP (Public Sector Purchase Program).The big question on the minds of currency traders across all trading desks is when will parity be attained on EURUSD. Not if but when.

A Crazy Week In Charts

A Crazy Week In Charts

What a week of utter craziness! After last week's inexhaustible flurry, we thought we'd see some respite. But no, the events just ratcheted one notch higher; with volatility in the financial markets at year-to-date highs and global developments on geopolitical, financial and economic fronts, we can barely keep up the the trance that is raving. So rather than using narrative to summarize what has been a very busy week, we thought of using charts to highlight the key talking points of the past 7 days or so.

This edition of the Daily Grail will be the first ever to feature a compendium of graphics and charts but we might indeed start to adopt a similar format in future editions for time constraints. We have tried to broaden the subjects covered under each piece while ensure each note remains relevant to our readers.

Jim Reid: Volatile Volatility

Jim Reid: Volatile Volatility

What makes this move shocking is that just last month the SNB committed themselves to preventing their currency appreciating beyond 1.20 to the Euro and vowed they would enforce the policy with "the utmost determination". The risk for the global financial system is that if the SNB can make such a dramatic u-turn could other central banks follow at some point. We're not so concerned here as their situation is arguably a lot different to the ECB. The ECB might actually look at the wider market moves yesterday and be scared to disappoint.

1-7 January: Oil & Euro Lowest Since Lehman As Grexit Fears Loom, EU In Deflation

1-7 January: Oil & Euro Lowest Since Lehman As Grexit Fears Loom, EU In Deflation

What a way to start 2015. The first deflation in the EU since 2009, record low yields on German sovereign debt, global energy prices keep tanking, US equities down for 5 consecutive days, and the news (or not) keeps flowing. For the record, major equity indices have started 2015 with the worst performance since the financial crisis of 2008. Whatever remnant of the 2014 "Santa Rally" turned out to be a ghost in a shell, and has now spooked global market participants.

The past week has been all about ratcheting up the "Grexit" rhetoric across the markets. Readers should be no stranger to the situation in Greece and the entire periphery of the Euro Union, which we touched upon in our last update preceding the New Year. The risk has indeed never been greater as it seems Germany has openly voiced that it won't be blackmailed by a Greek plunger. Remember, Greece is bounded by €240bn to the Troika under the various bailout packages extended to her.