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Europe On The Brink: €1.1 Trillion Bazooka & Greek Elections

Europe On The Brink: €1.1 Trillion Bazooka & Greek Elections
  • ECB to buy €60bn/month in assets
  • Purchases will be conducted "until we see a sustained adjustment to path of inflation"
  • Purchases to last until September 2016
  • ECB rates have reached lower bound
  • Sees sizable increase in ECB's balance sheet
  • Eurozone risks on the downside
  • Annual inflation is expected to remain very low or negative in months ahead
  • Volume of QE is in ballpark of getting ECB's balance sheet ti levels of early 2012
  • There has to be a program to buy GGBs; there is also an issuer limit
  • Don't have any special rule for Greece
  • Will buy bonds with negative yield

A quick take: Slightly more than expected per month, with a slightly shorter duration than expected, amounting to just about €1.1 trillion over 16 months, which is a tad on the low side to the super-aggressive expectations of €1 trillion per year. Furthermore, as expected there will be partial risk-sharing. It is still unclear what are the embedded conditions regarding purchasing Greek or other "risky" bonds.

Jim Reid: Volatile Volatility

Jim Reid: Volatile Volatility

What makes this move shocking is that just last month the SNB committed themselves to preventing their currency appreciating beyond 1.20 to the Euro and vowed they would enforce the policy with "the utmost determination". The risk for the global financial system is that if the SNB can make such a dramatic u-turn could other central banks follow at some point. We're not so concerned here as their situation is arguably a lot different to the ECB. The ECB might actually look at the wider market moves yesterday and be scared to disappoint.

17-18 December: Negative Swiss Rates; FOMC Shows Resolve Despite Risks; Russia Goes Full Frontal Amid Crisis

17-18 December: Negative Swiss Rates; FOMC Shows Resolve Despite Risks; Russia Goes Full Frontal Amid Crisis

It just keeps coming. In this week alone we have already seen 4 central bank events starting with Russia's immense 6.5% rate hike and other policy accessories that eventually led to the chaos we saw on Tuesday; the ECB then dropped hints that it might extend its QE to sovereign bonds instead of the covered securities it currently purchases; the the planned FOMC statement and press conference with the chair woman yesterday; and then the SNB (Swiss national bank) unexpectedly cut its deposit rate.