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April Review & Looking Forward (Part 2: Strategy)

April Review & Looking Forward (Part 2: Strategy)

In Part 1 of this note reviewing the eventful month of April, we spoke about how the tide was shifting in many of the developing economies with Europe's economy and financial conditions showing good signs of improvement while the American economy was undoubtedly slowing. We also spoke about macro economic cycles and how such polarities in the major economies have created exclusive opportunities in the financial markets.

With the current market climate hallmarked by panic, fear, and ephemeral swings, we have detected a couple of opportunities over the last couple of weeks that look promising in their own rights. In the last 2 weeks alone, a few records have already gone down the record books. This is heaven for opportunists.

In today's note, we wish to share our views and ongoing opinions on how we view the current market landscape and the strategies that we are and will likely be implementing to take advantage of the substantially different dynamics in today's environment.

April Review & Looking Forward (Part 1: Analysis)

April Review & Looking Forward (Part 1: Analysis)

April is set to close with a bang on what is easily the busiest week in terms of economic data releases for a long time. We have various sets of CPI and employment data releases from Europe the developed economiesGDP figures are also set to hit the wires, chiefly from the UK, US, and Canada

Central banks will be in hard focus where Australia's RBA fired the first salvo, followed by the FOMC, with New Zealand's RBNZ following suit. The BoJ will also hold its press conference. It is safe to say the market's attention will be fixated on the US 1Q15 GDP figures and the ensuing FOMC statement and press conference.

In this note, we will briefly go over some of the key developments we have seen in April across the globe from the American economy, to the renewed conflagrations in the tug of war between Greece and its creditors, to China's economic woes and financial troubles.

In Part 2, we will touch on the various markets we cover, present our views and purported strategies to trade them going forward.

Oil Prices Either Crash Or Rebound At This Juncture

Oil Prices Either Crash Or Rebound At This Juncture

Oil prices are at a major inflection point. They either turn higher or break multi-year support levels and cause more pain to oil producers. 

Nearly 2 months ago, we put out a note describing how we speculated on the upside of crude oil prices. We then subsequently implored if prices had indeed bottomed, and we made a case for both sides of the trade. Regular readers that follow our trades that we make public, will know that from the period spanning 1/27 till today, we have had 5 trades on oil. The results of these trades can be found in our most recent commentary dated 3/10.

In this note, we will share with readers a few takeaways we have gained, as well as what we expect going forward.

Euro Parity, Coming Sooner Than You Expect

Euro Parity, Coming Sooner Than You Expect

The time from when we last published our latest addition of the Daily Grail has been rather eventful. From the blistering jobs report 2 weeks ago that propelled market's expectation for a June rate hike even higher, to the continuation of monetary policy bifurcation by the world's central banks that will soon see the Euro trading at par to the Dollar, the month of March has so far endowed the financial markets with much needed cross-asset volatility.

On 22 January, the ECB unveiled something the world had never seen before. Mario Draghi, President of the European Central Bank, announced that for the first time in the 14 years of the Euro's existence, the ECB was going to monetize debt securities to the tune of €60bn/month. Just 2 short months ago, the ECB termed this open market operation the EAPP (Expanded Asset Purchase Program).

2 months and 1000 pips later, the ECB has coined a new term - the PSPP (Public Sector Purchase Program).The big question on the minds of currency traders across all trading desks is when will parity be attained on EURUSD. Not if but when.

US Economy Officially In Deflation

US Economy Officially In Deflation

We spoke, we warned, and it has now happened. For reference, we have included a bevy of links documenting our explanation of why deflation was going to be the elephant in the China room.

With the significance of this being the first deflationary headline figure 6 years after Lehman collapsed, low oil prices have conveniently been cast as the straw man. There is some truth to this - the energy index fell 9.7% while the gasoline index fell 18.7% in January, both over December. This marks the fiercest plunge in the 7 consecutive negative prints; the report also noted that the decline in the gasoline was "overwhelmingly the cause" for broad weakness in overall prices. When annualized, the energy index and gasoline index fell 19.6% and 35.4% respectively. Staggering figures!

23-28 December: Record Highs on Santa Rally; Russia Say Ruble Crisis Over; Japanese Prices Slip Yet Lower

23-28 December: Record Highs on Santa Rally; Russia Say Ruble Crisis Over; Japanese Prices Slip Yet Lower

The S&P 500 index closed at a record high of 2083 at Friday's close, capping what has been an ebullient Christmas week where equities have historically enjoyed outsized returns relative to volatility. Indeed, the S&P 500 was joined by the Russell 2000 index of stocks and the DJIA (Dow Jones Industrial Average of 30 stocks) to close Friday at their respective record highs.

Trading volumes have been thin across the board, perhaps not so in China where people apparently are told not to celebrate the festivities of Christmas, as markets there remained opened for the entire week. Apart from American markets, the Shanghai Composite surged to a record high this past week. Reason? Mainstream media has been blaring more stimuli from the PBoC. If indeed true, that the PBoC is indeed gearing up for more stimulus come 2015, it would indeed be trying to balance a very tricky scale. Readers will recall that earlier in December, the PBoC reigned in on shadow banking by tightening collateral rules; and now wants to prop up asset prices by introducing more stimulus via other conduits? Seems like some central bankers over there are a little confused on what they actually wish to achieve with their Schrödinger policies.