Treasuries

Goldman Says Overweight Cash On Mounting Global Risks

Goldman Says Overweight Cash On Mounting Global Risks

More and more are jumping on the "sell in May and go away" bandwagon but for good reason. As U.S. stocks base around in short term trading awaiting more cues about a potential June rate hike from the April FOMC minutes to be released later today, the big players have their eye on the bigger picture.

This is something we've talked about on these pages, and something we buy, on the caveat that technical factors turn conducive. The month of May has historically heralded volatility in the financial markets.

The key takeaways from Goldman are: Overweight cash, avoid equities, look to profit from up in quality carry, and perhaps buy some volatility.

Bill Gross: About Helicopter Money

Bill Gross: About Helicopter Money

Technology and mass robotization are probably the single biggest threats to our jobs. Jobs of both the blue and white collars are gradually being replaced by robots that are much more cost efficient and productive. Plus, robots have no want for minimum wages, or hold strikes in protest for what is now a huge skill deficiency in the labor force across the world.

So will politicians and central planners dabble with the risk of upsetting the status quo for a potential change in direction? Unlikely.

Rather, Janus Capital's Bill Gross believes central planners will stick to what they have always been best at: Printing money (QE), lowering interest rates or bringing them sub zero as we've seen recently, and fiscally stimulating economies with debt funded programs thereby creating a false impression of prosperity when there isn't.

Bill Gross: Careful Of What You Wish For With Negative Rates

Bill Gross: Careful Of What You Wish For With Negative Rates

"30-40% of developed bond markets now have negative yields and 75% of Japanese JGB’s do" is how Bill Gross likes to drop some perspective onto the world that has become so numb to the new age central banking tool known as NRIP, or negative interest rate policy. It's absolutely perverse, and it's everywhere like how Vampire Squid has its tentacles all over political campaigns in America.

Business cycles have become so influenced by asset price inflation, or in some cases deflation, that they have lost a good deal of traction with the more traditional Keneysian theory of aggregate demand and aggregate supply.

Gross ultimately warns that if global economies continue to merely drift on stagnant waters, failing to see a breakaway renaissance in output growth, we might be in for a rude awakening when the chickens come home to roost. Eventually they shall.

What The Smartest Minds Think Of The Current Rout

What The Smartest Minds Think Of The Current Rout

2016 is shaping up to be like the latter half of 2015 but with a lot of additional dynamic forces warping and twisting the financial markets. Higher than average volatility has been the common theme so far but we're also noticing an incredible rapid shift in cross asset correlations. All this means that the current market environment is extremely rough, giving traders (ourselves included) a hell of a hard time.

It is no surprise that this is indeed the case. Policy uncertainty amongst central banks, oil prices that are stick in a moribund rut, very idiosyncratic technical flows that have caused traditionally lower beta assets to trade like mad donkeys, and of course the deep polarization of sentiment across the board.

It is on this note that we turn to JP Morgan's quantitative desk for answers, albeit nebulous. The desk analyzes markets in a less traditional manner, approaching this landscape with mathematical and technical tools most retail traders have zero access to.

Are Money Markets Warning Of An Unknown Unknown?

Are Money Markets Warning Of An Unknown Unknown?

It has been deftly espoused that there are two types of unknowns - known unknowns and unknown unknowns. And because risk is most commonly associated with uncertainty (i.e. unknowns), there are some risks that can never be completely hedged against - unknown risks.

Earlier last week, the 10-year swap spread went negative for the first time since 2010, making this one of the only 4 occasions since 2007 that spreads have defined financial gravity. The 5-year swap spread is on the verge of being negative, which if happens would make it the first ever in history.

The take away condensation for readers would be to prepare for unknown unknowns. 7 years of zero interest rates have distorted markets and their pricing engines on an unimaginable scale. Models that price risk, and dictate where billions of dollars flow into on a daily basis have been so badly screwed by artificially suppressed borrowing costs that a positive shock to the system knows no bounds.

Plainly said, we don't know what to expect. You can't hedge a risk you haven't yet seen. Be cautious!

Bill Gross: Worry About "Return Of Capital" Instead Of "Return On Capital"

Bill Gross: Worry About "Return Of Capital" Instead Of "Return On Capital"

In this month's investment outlook, Janus Capital's Bill Gross warns about the mounting stresses in the global financial markets and why you should be much more concerned about the return of your capital, than the return on your capital.

Clearly for the bond king, size does matter. The size of recent market movements, during a time when most central banks in major developed markets have stopped their balance sheet expansion programs, is telling us participants that all is not well and that there may be something lurking behind the shadows.

Gross talks about how nearly 8 years of zero bound interest rates and QE have led to a global economy that is now so out of whack it would take a shock, in the form of secularly higher interest rates and borrowing costs, to fix. But therein lies the rub. Markets get absolutely spooked on any mention of a rate hike or a cut back in existing expansionary monetary policies (ECB, BoJ, PBoC, ect...).

 

Bill Gross: "Nightmare Panic Selling" Coming

Bill Gross: "Nightmare Panic Selling" Coming

When Bill Gross speaks, the markets better listen. At Business Of Finance, we reserve a great reverence for Mr Gross not only for his adept ability to foretell mega trends in the financial markets, but also because the man has a rare talent in piecing everything together to form investment thesis that have proven to work well.

Retail investors and traders now have access to very complex financial instruments such as bond fund and volatility ETFs, and more recently funds that are synthesized using cross currency total return swaps on extremely illiquid markets such as a ferrous commodity contract that trades on a futures exchange in China.

Bill Gross' latest investment outlook titled "It Never Rains In California" delves into the reasons why the bond king believe a fat tail may be in the making, and why investors and traders should be prepared for it by having enough liquidity when the boat tips.

Do retail investors and traders really know what they have involved themselves with? We hope so, but logic tells us otherwise.