Investments

Here's Why Dumping Risk & Buying Cash Might Be The Smartest Move This Year

Here's Why Dumping Risk & Buying Cash Might Be The Smartest Move This Year

It's been an extremely busy first week of 2016 for Business Of Finance. Global markets are in a state of frenzied chaos, much like a chicken running around without its head.Only this time every risk asset has been sold with reckless abandon while liquidity is conversely bid to the moon. Anyone who shorted risk, went long volatility, and stayed in cash since Christmas week would be gleefully grinning at the poor folks who are trapped in 2015's outdated ideologue 

While we are hard pressed for time, we feel we need to put this piece out to give readers a first glance of what 2016 might be like for the markets all across the world. We have a feeling 2016 may be markedly different from the past 5 years where cash might actually be the best performing asset. Yes, being in cash is a position in and of itself.

In layman's speak, you ether go big or go home in 2016. At least that's what we think. You could make a hack a lot of profits or loose your shirt in the kind of markets we've been greeted with so far. So buckle up, sit tight, sell risk and buy cash.

Bill Gross: Worry About "Return Of Capital" Instead Of "Return On Capital"

Bill Gross: Worry About "Return Of Capital" Instead Of "Return On Capital"

In this month's investment outlook, Janus Capital's Bill Gross warns about the mounting stresses in the global financial markets and why you should be much more concerned about the return of your capital, than the return on your capital.

Clearly for the bond king, size does matter. The size of recent market movements, during a time when most central banks in major developed markets have stopped their balance sheet expansion programs, is telling us participants that all is not well and that there may be something lurking behind the shadows.

Gross talks about how nearly 8 years of zero bound interest rates and QE have led to a global economy that is now so out of whack it would take a shock, in the form of secularly higher interest rates and borrowing costs, to fix. But therein lies the rub. Markets get absolutely spooked on any mention of a rate hike or a cut back in existing expansionary monetary policies (ECB, BoJ, PBoC, ect...).