High yield bonds

Deutsche Bank: "We See No Further Upside For European Equities..."

Deutsche Bank: "We See No Further Upside For European Equities..."

It seems like more and more of the big names are turning bearish on risk. Day after day of directionless trading, huge intraday swings in the equity markets, and a very confusing macro backdrop has bred a lot of frustration amongst investors and traders, ourselves included.

We ardently advocate staying on the sidelines because we just don't know what is going to ensue. Yes, we have our own biases (with whatever we discussed about here, here, and here) but these biases aren't going to be beneficial in anyway unless the markets start trending again, which at this point is highly unlikely.

The number one principal for both small and big players would then be to preserve capital and ride out the volatility.We prefer to stay very lowly exposed or not exposed at all.

Goldman Says Overweight Cash On Mounting Global Risks

Goldman Says Overweight Cash On Mounting Global Risks

More and more are jumping on the "sell in May and go away" bandwagon but for good reason. As U.S. stocks base around in short term trading awaiting more cues about a potential June rate hike from the April FOMC minutes to be released later today, the big players have their eye on the bigger picture.

This is something we've talked about on these pages, and something we buy, on the caveat that technical factors turn conducive. The month of May has historically heralded volatility in the financial markets.

The key takeaways from Goldman are: Overweight cash, avoid equities, look to profit from up in quality carry, and perhaps buy some volatility.

Bill Gross: Careful Of What You Wish For With Negative Rates

Bill Gross: Careful Of What You Wish For With Negative Rates

"30-40% of developed bond markets now have negative yields and 75% of Japanese JGB’s do" is how Bill Gross likes to drop some perspective onto the world that has become so numb to the new age central banking tool known as NRIP, or negative interest rate policy. It's absolutely perverse, and it's everywhere like how Vampire Squid has its tentacles all over political campaigns in America.

Business cycles have become so influenced by asset price inflation, or in some cases deflation, that they have lost a good deal of traction with the more traditional Keneysian theory of aggregate demand and aggregate supply.

Gross ultimately warns that if global economies continue to merely drift on stagnant waters, failing to see a breakaway renaissance in output growth, we might be in for a rude awakening when the chickens come home to roost. Eventually they shall.

ECB Cuts Rates, Boosts QE & Murders Euro Shorts

ECB Cuts Rates, Boosts QE & Murders Euro Shorts

Read that again. Does the title make any sense? Just how did the ECB murder euro shorts with even more easing?

The ECB has made its move this week. Even lower negative interest rates, more QE, and rhetoric that should all else equal send the euro tumbling to new lows.

But exactly the opposite happened an hour after news hit the wires. Baffled yet? Well, most traders were. The stupendous volatility this single event has brought to the financial markets is difficult to overstate.

Contrary to intuition, the euro (EURUSD) is some 420 pips north of Thursday's lows, making this one of the largest and most brutal intraday reversals we've seen in a long while. Yields on core European sovereign debt are all higher, instead of lower. Such moves make little sense considering how much looser monetary policy is now in the Eurozone. Or does it? Let us explain.

Goldman's Take On Enhancing Returns In A Yield Deprived World

Goldman's Take On Enhancing Returns In A Yield Deprived World

Traders and asset managers across the world have found themselves in a market deprived of yield. We have our central bankers and their policies of zero or negative interest rates to thank.

The quest to find every marginal basis point of return has led the smartest minds to venture where few dare to. There has perhaps never been a time with this abundance of money being left clueless on where next to pour into for that extra basis point of alpha. This scares us.

There are various ways in which zero-yielding cash tries to gain alpha. One such way, and one which we feel has been one of the best and most consistent strategies to enhance returns, is to sell short-term volatility (vol) on U.S. equities.

This often misunderstood and underrated strategy has generated an impressive overall return through the last decade. The consistency of this strategy is what attracts us, along with its relative simplicity both in theory and practice.